The Supreme Court’s new ruling that poll candidates and their relatives must reveal the source of their income, infringes their fundamental right to privacy
BY AAKRITI KOHLI| IN PRIVACY |28/09/2017
The absence of a legal framework compelling maximum disclosure by corporations on their use of customer data, is dangerous.
BY VENKATESH NAYAK| IN PRIVACY |28/07/2017
On at least three occasions, the Constitutional Courts protected the right to privacy of judges and the judiciary.
BY TIMOTHY SUMMERS| IN PRIVACY |19/12/2016
As an ethical hacker, my job is to help protect those who are unable, or lack the knowledge, to help themselves.
BY SANJAY GOEL| IN PRIVACY |20/09/2016
The extent and scope of intelligence agencies’ ability to intercept communications and collect information is mind-boggling.
BY SMARIKA KUMAR| IN LAW AND POLICY |08/04/2016
Using classification strategies to get legal sanction for new, controversial technologies is not unique or a one-off.
IN PRIVACY |04/09/2014
Indians are routinely subjected to government surveillance on a staggering scale -7500 to 9000 telephone interception orders by the Central Government each month!
IN PRIVACY |20/05/2014
Apart from the conflation of commercial data protection and privacy, the right to privacy bill has ill-informed and poorly drafted provisions to regulate surveillance.
BY BHAIRAV ACHARYA| IN PRIVACY |15/04/2014
The absence of a statute expressing the legislative will of a democracy to forge a common understanding of privacy is a matter of concern,
BY BHAIRAV ACHARYA| IN PRIVACY |18/11/2013
The Central Monitoring System project is being tested and put in place without the sanction of a specific Act of Parliament.
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Former journalist and AAP politician Ashutosh's resignation from his party announced on Twitter on August 15 is followed by another tweet: "To media friends. Please respect my privacy. I won’t be giving any bite of any kind. Please cooperate." His resignation he says is "purely from a very very personal reason."                     

Well-known cartoonist Satish Acharya took to Facebook to say that his column with Mail Today ended after multiple attempts to censor his work. The latest was a cartoon on China's growing influence in the sub-continent, rejected because it was ostensibly 'defeatist'. Ironically, he said  cartoons critical of BJP President Amit Shah featured on the latter's personal website, which makes us wonder if this was another case of crawling when asked to  bend!                      
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